Do I do character design? YASSS!

A while ago I finished working on an amazing project. It involved creating characters and illustrations for an educational app to help prevent racism. Read more about it here.

This morning however, I heard back from the client who needed a specific graphic for promotional uses. The graphic was to have all of the characters together as a group. I suddenly realised how many characters I designed and developed for the one app; 30 in total! It also reminded me how much I love working on character design. There’s something so wonderful about using your imagination and creating a little being. Every detail is so deliberate to building that character’s personality.

all_characters_meekins

Editorial illustrations for The Guardian: Part One

It seems I’m on a roll with The Guardian, which is good news for this Guardian fan girl. They are doing a six part series on the impact robots will have on our work and lifestyle.

Part one starts with this paragraph, which gets my mind racing: When Aristotle described “the complete happiness of man”, he thought it would include, among other things, “self-sufficiency, leisureliness and unweariedness”. Unfortunately the philosopher concluded that “such a life would be too high for man” – it was suitable only for the gods. All the same, he encouraged humanity to keep striving to get as close to “complete happiness” as possible.

Read more here, it’s a pretty neat article.

future_of_work_essay1_illustration_final

My recent work featured in The Age

I have been very quiet on the blog front these last few months. I blame it on preparing for moving house….and now a couple of weeks settling in to said house. I moved from country Victoria to a suburb near the city of Melbourne. I can’t express how much I’m enjoying the creativity of this city and the warm hum of its people.

Another piece of excitement recently was having my work featured in an article on The Age. The work is from an educational app I provided illustrations for to help prevent racism in schools. I wrote about it a few blog posts ago. It was such a worthwhile project to work on and I feel so grateful for the opportunity, hey. You can read more about it here.

scenario_5_final_part_4_WM

Latest project: illustrations for an educational app to reduce racism in schools

Well, it seems that the universe has an understanding of the types of projects I would be over the moon to work on. One I’m currently a part of is an educational app for Australian children, put together by an incredibly worthwhile charity, All Together Now. My involvement is to design characters and provide illustrations for various scenarios based on exclusion around racism.

A bit more about the app: “A recent study of NSW teachers’ found that only half of classroom teachers had undertaken professional learning around incorporating anti-racism strategies into lessons, with 20% not having taken any professional learning in the area of multiculturalism. 60% of teachers agreed that implementing anti-racism strategies are effective for fostering cultural inclusiveness in school….In response to the findings in our research and development phase, All Together Now will be creating an evidence-based app that will teach students in Year 2 (8 years old) and Year 4 (10 years old) how to identify and challenge non race-based and race-based exclusion….”  You can read more about the whole project here.

scenario_4_final_part_5_WM

Personally, I was on the receiving end of some pretty harsh bullying at primary school. It hurt in more ways than one. But the sad thing is, I can remember instances where I joined in on jokes and jaunting of other children who weren’t Caucasian, (because they weren’t). It’s incredibly shameful to admit. If I could take it all back, I would. So I guess the next best thing for me to do is to contribute to positive change, now.

 

In Search of Safety illustrations for The Red Cross

I was so incredibly thrilled when recently approached by The Red Cross to work on an illustration commission. The project, funded by The Australian Government (which I find surprising) is to educate children about common myths surrounding asylum seekers. I created 7 illustrations, which will soon be pieced together by The Red Cross design team as a giant poster to be distributed amongst Australian primary school classrooms. I feel like misinformed adults could also gain a wider perspective from these facts. I’ll share each illustration with you in the coming days.

So here’s the first.

FACT 1: Are asylum seekers illegal?

NO. Everyone has the right to seek asylum. Asylum seekers do not break any Australian laws by simply arriving on boats or without permission. (Article 31 of the Refugee Convention)

red_cross_sarah_gleeson_isos_1